Who invented the first GIF?

Steve Wilhite is an American computer scientist who worked at CompuServe and was the primary creator of the GIF file format, which went on to become the de facto standard for 8-bit color images on the Internet until PNG became a viable alternative. He developed the GIF (Graphic Interchange Format) in 1987.

What was the first ever GIF?

On June 15, 1987, Trevor and his team, which included inventor Steve Wilhite, released an enhanced version of the GIF called 87a. The new format allowed people to create compressed animations using timed delays. “I think the first GIF was a picture of a plane.

When was the first GIF invented?

GIF

An animated GIF of a rotating globe
Filename extension .gif
Developed by CompuServe
Initial release 15 June 1987
Latest release 89a (1989)

How old is GIF?

The GIF is officially 30-something, and in the prime of its internet life. Three decades ago, on June 15, 1987, the most beloved image file extension on the internet was birthed by a team of CompuServe developers seeking a way to compress images with minimal data loss.

Who invented gifs woman?

Black History Facts: Lisa Gelobter Founder of Graphics Interchange Format The ‘GIF” If you ever expressed a thought through a video image, or streamed video online through HULU and Shockwave, well, we have to credit African-American inventor Lisa Gelobter the genius in online animation.

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Is it pronounced GIF or Jif?

“It’s pronounced JIF, not GIF.” Just like the peanut butter. “The Oxford English Dictionary accepts both pronunciations,” Wilhite told The New York Times. “They are wrong. It is a soft ‘G,’ pronounced ‘jif.

Combined with the emotional shorthand and cultural references they carry, GIFs allow users to simultaneously express their mood, sense of humor, and identity in a low-effort way like no other digital medium can. The efficiency of its expressiveness is the ultimate power of GIFs and the key to its enduring popularity.

Are GIF images real?

A GIF Is Just an Animated Image

We say “animated images” because GIFs aren’t really videos. If anything, they’re more like flipbooks. For one, they don’t have sound (you probably noticed that). … CompuServe published the GIF format in 1987, and it was last updated in 1989.

How did GIF get its name?

The origins of GIF come from the words it stands for: Graphics Interchange Format, which come from the inventor, Steve Wilhite, who aligned the pronunciation with the pronunciation rule.

What exactly is a GIF?

A GIF (Graphical Interchange Format) is an image format invented in 1987 by Steve Wilhite, a US software writer who was looking for a way to animate images in the smallest file size. In short, GIFs are a series of images or soundless video that will loop continuously and doesn’t require anyone to press play.

What does GIF mean in texting?

GIF means “Graphics Interchange Format” (image type). The acronym GIF stands for “Graphics Interchange Format.” A GIF is a short, animated picture, without sound.

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What is GIF commonly used for?

Stands for “Graphics Interchange Format.” GIF is an image file format commonly used for images on the web and sprites in software programs. Unlike the JPEG image format, GIFs uses lossless compression that does not degrade the quality of the image.

Who made up GIFs?

Steve Wilhite is an American computer scientist who worked at CompuServe and was the primary creator of the GIF file format, which went on to become the de facto standard for 8-bit color images on the Internet until PNG became a viable alternative. He developed the GIF (Graphic Interchange Format) in 1987.

Why was GIF invented?

Developer Steve Wilhite and his team at tech giant CompuServe had a problem to solve: how to make a computer display an image while also saving memory. … His new creation could be used for exchange images between computers, and he called it Graphics Interchange Format. The GIF was born.

Already more than a decade old and with roots reaching to June 15th, 1987—half a decade before the World Wide Web itself—the GIF was showing its age. It offered support for a paltry 256 colors. Its animation capabilities were easily rivaled by a flipbook.

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