Reportage-Why I fell in Love with it!

The Oxford English Dictionary cites the origin of the word ‘reportage’ to come from the Early 17th century French, from Old French reporter ‘to carry back’.   In this way, reportage illustration is a form of visual journalism, visual storytelling.  You go out into the world around you and take back with you that experience.   That memory, in drawn form, with pen, and ink and…. whatever else it is possible to record onto a surface with. Continue reading

Holiday sketching: Zante in a sketchbook

lizsscribbles_zantesketchbook2

As promised, this is the second post of my holiday sketches from Zante, the first, arguably more polished sketches, can be found here.  I am so pleased that I decided to take a small portable A5 moleskin watercolour sketchbook as well as working on loose paper.  The sketchbook enabled me to record my visual diary, in parallel with the finished pieces on paper and importantly, it allowed me to be looser, more experimental, less polished and to have fun!    Continue reading

Preparing for #USkManchester2016: People Practice

In my last blog: A change is as good as a rest, I mentioned that I would be posting something of my actual sketching practice in the lead up to the Urban sketching symposium in Manchester at the end of the month.  This is the first of a couple of posts I hope to do and reflects some of my people drawing sketching practice.  In preparation, I have been looking at several books, blogs, Craftsy and other on line video courses so particular thanks to  James Richards, Suhita Shirodkar, Marc Taro Holmes, Melanie Reim, Lynnne Chapman and Gabi Campanario for their inspiration and direction.  I’ve also been doing some sketching!  All I can say is, its work in progress for me!! Continue reading

A change is as good as a rest

I spend quite a bit of time sketching in Manchester and as a result, can get a little overloaded with the cityscape!  So, as this last weekend was the last chance I would have, before the Urban Sketching Symposium in Manchester (#USkManchester2016), I decided upon a different environment for my sketching and headed off to the south Lakes, around lake Windermere. Recently I have been doing specific commissions and this has meant that the fast and quick sketches, that are going to be the order of the day for the symposium, have taken a back seat.  Therefore, in this first week of my own personal sketching practice countdown to the symposium I decided to let myself in gently (although the voice in my head is shouting very loudly: Don’t panic Mr Mannering!!).   Continue reading

#Citiesofhope: A day in the life of a reportage piece

This is my second blog about my involvement in #citiesofhope.  You can read my first blog about it here.  The convention of CitiesOfHope 21-29th May has now finished, but the incredible legacy of these amazing pieces of wall art prevails.    Their impact across walls in the Northern Quarter in Manchester, UK has been and continues to be amazing, prompting much in the way of discussion, photography and a stop, stare (and think) moment.   The difference between these and other street art is that each of the pieces of art are reflecting and communicating about a key social justice cause from Homelessness to Child war and globalisation. Furthermore, each of the 10 main pieces is linked to a local charity reflecting aspects of that social justice issue.   The intention is that for each wall, monies will be raised through various means, including the selling of artworks. In this blog I am going to focus on the production of my urbansketching reportage artworks of each of the 10 main pieces, for which I was commissioned a few weeks ago and which were completed from 21 May-8th June 2016. Continue reading

The Writing’s on the wall…..The importance of lettering in a drawing

In the beginning

I have long been an admirer of elegant beautiful writing and lettering. When I started drawing very regularly, I didn’t make much of my writing. Over the years it had become scrawly and non-descript although I had originally been taught italic writing at school (yep, italic dip pen and ink, wooden desks, lines of letters, you get the picture). I realized that I wanted to be able to write more on my journal pages, but not in that scatchy sloppy writing.   Sometimes I want to just add a title, but it is is often a longer narrative, about the place, the people, the conversations.   The storytelling in words needed to become a part of the drawing and so I began thinking about my handwriting and about making my pages distinctive and attractive. I returned to practicing handwriting and to thinking about italic writing and how to use it more stylishly on my journal pages. In conjunction, I was interested in lettering such as that of Charles Rennie Mackintosh and by studying this and watching artists like Pat Southern-Pearce I started to develop my own combination. It has been evolving now for about a year or so. Here are some examples: Continue reading